Pablo Helguera: Combinatory Lecture

Friday, December 1, 6–8PM

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Please join Ulises, in partnership with Graduate Studies at Moore College of Art and Design, for a combinatory lecture with multidisciplinary artist and educator Pablo Helguera organized in conjunction with Ulises’ current quarterly theme “Education.” This performance workshop, which incorporates aspects of public speaking and education, consists in the collective writing and presenting of a co-authored lecture. No previous experience of any kind is needed. Different versions of the Combinatory lecture have been presented at the MUAC, Mexico City, Neon Gallery in Bologna Italy, Museo del Hombre in Gran Canaria, and many other locations.

Please Register here. Seating is limited. Event is free.

Pablo Helguera (b. Mexico City, 1971) is a multidisciplinary artist and educator based in New York City. Working in performance, photography, drawing, installation, lectures, and musical composition, among other diverse media, he creates artworks that investigate topics such as history, pedagogy, sociolinguistics, ethnography, memory, and the absurd. Helguera’s projects often blur the line between pedagogy and politically engaged art, raising the question of how educational methodologies can contribute to Social Practice, and vice versa.

Book Launch: Words, Books, and the Spaces They Inhabit

Sunday, October 15, 3–5PM

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Join Ulises for a book launch and conversation celebrating the release of “Words, Books, and the Spaces They Inhabit” (Sternberg Press, 2017) a new publication by Mari Shaw and the first in her series “The Noble Art of Collecting.”

Mari will be joined by Sarah Hamerman, an art librarian working at the Whitney Museum and MoMA Libraries, and scholar Jean-Michel Rabaté, Professor of English Literature, Penn.

Sarah will present on the legacy of artists’ books and artist Ulises Carrion, the namesake of Ulises bookshop who figures prominently in Shaw’s book, while Jean-Michel will speak briefly about Walter Benjamin whose ideas on book collecting are an organizing element in Shaw’s publication.

With examples of unexpected collectors and serendipitous outcomes, Shaw investigates the obscure desires that shape art collecting and the public goodwill that results from it. What was lost when the scrolls in the ancient library of Alexandria were destroyed? How did Catherine the Great’s collecting change the way we think? How do Jeff Bezos and Amazon.com expand our appreciation of books as objects? Though the ways we communicate and live vary, history has been created, recorded, and preserved in writing. Words and the spaces that contain them are crucial to an empathetic understanding of our world.

RSVP HERE

MORE ABOUT THE BOOK

Dear Reader: Dignity Has No Nationality & Migrant Manifesto

Tuesday, October 10, 6–8PM

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“We are all tied to more than one country. The multilaterally shaped phenomenon of migration cannont be solved unilaterally, or else it generates a vulnerable reality for migrants. Implementing universal rights is essential. The right to be inlcluded belongs to everyone.”

Join Ulises for a group discussion facilitated by Nora Elmarzouky on two timely essays by artist Tania Bruguera: “Dignity Has No Nationality” and “Migrant Manifesto.” RSVP HERE

READINGS:

Tania Bruguera, born in 1968 in Havana, is a politically motivated performance artist, explores the relationship between art, activism, and social change in works that examine the social effects of political and economic power. By creating proposals and aesthetic models for others to use and adapt, she defines herself as an initiator rather than an author, and often collaborates with multiple institutions as well as many individuals so that the full realization of her artwork occurs when others adopt and perpetuate it.

Nora Elmarzouky grew up between Egypt and Pennsylvania. With a BA from Tufts University in International Relations, coupled with her studies in Spain, Morocco, and the Czech Republic, her interest in the interactions between humans, culture, identity, and the built environment was enhanced. She is currently supporting alternative Arab spaces, connecting sustainable dots, a Founders Fellow with Impact100, and expanding in.site collaborative in Philadelphia - a collective of designers and researchers working to make urban development and change more participatory and equitable. Additionally, she is managing Friends, Peace, and Sanctuary Project at Swarthmore bringing archives above refugee crises into the contemporary with Syrian and Iraqi refugees and creating art books with artists.

Image: Tania Bruguera. Immigrant Movement International. First public reading of the Migrant Manifesto. United Nations Students Conference on Human Rights. December 2, 2011. Courtesy IMI.

Xaviera Simmons, Superunknown (Alive In The)

Xaviera Simmons, “Superunknown (Alive In The),” 2010. C-prints mounted on sintra with brace each photo 20 x 30 inches, Edition of 3 Courtesy: David Castillo Gallery

NY Art Book Fair

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Next weekend Ulises will be at the New York Art Book Fair, organized by Printed Matter at MoMA PS1.

  • Preview Thursday, September 21, 6-9 pm
  • Friday, September 22, 1-7pm
  • Saturday, September 23, 11am-9pm
  • Sunday, September 24, 11-am-7pm

Philly Book Launch of "We Have the Great Discontent" with John Shahidi of Avril50

Saturday, September 9 from 4–6 PM

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Join us for the Philadelphia launch of We Have the Great Discontent, a book of found poetry by Joel Evey, published by Actual Source. The book’s sole inspiration — the legendary John Shahidi of Avril50 — will be in attendance. There will be snacks, drinks and books for sale. RSVP

Joel Evey is a designer and educator based in Philadelphia, PA.

Reading Evening

Saturday, August 26, 2017, 7PM

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Book launch for The Obvious Earth, an essay collection from Carville Annex Press in San Francisco. Join us for an evening of sounds/sentences with Caren Beilin, Tristan Dahn and Nabil Kashyap. Snacks are likely. Come!

Caren Beilin is the author of the novel The University of Pennsylvania (Noemi Press) and a forthcoming book of nonfiction, SPAIN (Rescue Press). Her fiction has appeared in McSweeney’s, Fence, the Offing and elsewhere. She lives in Philadelphia.

Tristan Dahn is a librarian and semi-frequent performer of music in the Philadelphia arts scene interested in resonance, texture, and form.

Nabil Kashyap wrote The Obvious Earth (Carville Annex Press) and has had work appear places like Actually People Quarterly, Colorado Review, DIAGRAM, Seneca Review and Versal. He is a librarian based in Philadelphia.

Marwa Arsanios Screening and Conversation

Saturday, August 19, 2017, 4–6PM

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Migrations contributor Marwa Arsanios will appear via Skype for a conversation and screening of the artist’s two recent video works, “Falling Is Not Collapsing, Falling Is Extending” and “Who is afraid of ideology.”

RSVP

“Through recorded testimony, Who is afraid of ideology? Part I tracks the practical work of the Kurdish autonomous women’s movement—how to use an axe, how to eat fish within its biological cycles of production, when to cut down a tree for survival and when to save it. But the film also explores how individuals come to a conscious participation in the movement—in short, how they become part of the guerrilla.” - Mason Leaver-Yap

In “Falling Is Not Collapsing, Falling Is Extending,” Marwa Arsanios addresses the impact of the migration of waste on the changing landscape of Beirut, the city where she lives and works, which has been marked by the rapid development of its urban spaces and burdened by a recent garbage crisis.

Marwa Arsanios was born in Washington D.C. and lives and works in Beirut, Lebanon. She received her MFA from University of the Arts London in 2007 and was a researcher in the Fine Art department at Jan Van Eyck Academie from 2011 to 2012. She has had solo exhibitions at Witte de With, Rotterdam, the Netherlands (2016); The Hammer, Los Angeles (2016); Kunsthalle Lissabon, Lisbon (2015); and Art in General, New York (2015). Her work was also shown at the 55th Venice Biennale (2013); the 12th Istanbul Biennial (2011); Home Works Forum in Beirut (2010, 2013, 2015); the New Museum, New York (2014); M HKA, Antwerp, Belgium (2013); and nGbK, Berlin (2012). Screenings of her videos have taken place at the Berlinale, Berlin (2010, 2015), e-flux storefront, New York (2009), and Centre Pompidou, Paris (2011). In 2012, Arsanios was awarded the special prize of the Pinchuk Future Generation Art Prize.

Brownbook 64: Taxis Issue Release

Saturday, August 12, 4–6pm

Join Ulises for the US release of Taxis, Issue 64 of Brownbook magazine. For this issue, Brownbook takes a road trip with five taxi drivers from across the Middle East and North Africa, joining Ismail Khaouli, one of Morocco’s last grand taxi drivers, along the roads that wind through the Atlas Mountains and stopping along Muscat’s coastline with Mohamed Al Nuumani, the Omani student who taxis passengers around on the side. RSVP

The issue release party will feature screenings of Brownbook’s short video features and interviews, as well as refreshments and an opportunity to browse and purchase a selection of themed back issues.

Launched over 10 years ago, Brownbook is the essential guide to the contemporary Middle East and North Africa focusing on architecture, travel and other culture. The bimonthly magazine is dedicated to documenting the lesser known stories of the region – from the music of Kuwaiti pearl divers to the Iranian diaspora of Los Angeles.

Alex da Corte Book Launch

Saturday, July 29, 2017, 3-6PM

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Book launch and barbecue cookout with Alex Da Corte celebrating the release of “Slow Graffiti” and “50 Wigs,” two recent publications of the artist’s work.

Soak in the summer with food, refreshments, and readings by Alissa Bennett and Sam McKinniss as well as a rotating screening of Da Corte’s latest video work. RSVP HERE

Alex Da Corte’s artist’s book “Slow Graffiti,” made on the occasion of his show at Vienna Secession, comprises two volumes: a conversation between the artist and the Los Angeles-based writer and critic Bruce Hainley, and Sorcery, a photographic comic strip by New York-based curator and writer Bob Nickas.

“50 Wigs” includes essays by art writer William Pym, curator Kim Nguyen (CCA Wattis), and artist Sam McKinniss, and is made in collaboration with Da Corte and The Andy Warhol Museum for his 2016 show at Herning Museum of Art.

Alex Da Corte was born in Camden, New Jersey, in 1980. He received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of the Arts, Philadelphia, and a Master of Fine Arts from the Yale University School of Art. His first survey exhibition Free Roses was held at MASS MoCA, North Adams in 2016. Other recent exhibitions include Slow Graffiti at Vienna Secession, Austria (2017); A Man Full Of Trouble at Maccarone Gallery, New York; 50 Wigs at the Herning Museum of Contemporary Art, Herning, Denmark; Dreamlands: Immersive Cinema and Art, 1905–2016 at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; A Season in He’ll at Art + Practice, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2016); Easternsports at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia (2014, together with Jayson Musson). In 2012, Da Corte was awarded a Pew Fellowship in the Arts from the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage.

Crime enthusiast and writer Alissa Bennett was born in Providence, Rhode Island in 1980. She is the author of DEAD IS BETTER, a twice-yearly zine dedicated to celebrity death, criminal behavior, and the American television program Intervention. Bennett lives and works in Brooklyn.

Sam McK­in­niss is an artist in New York. His paintings have been fea­tured in numerous group shows and solo presentations internationally. Most recently, his portrait of the pop star Lorde was featured as the cover art for her sophomore album, “Melodrama.” As a writer, McKinniss frequently collaborates with Da Corte, having created a monologue featured in the exhibition “Slow Graffiti” as well as contributing a semi-biographical essay to the catalog for “50 Wigs.”

Opening: No. 3 Migrations

Saturday, July 1, 2017, 3–7PM

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Please join Ulises in celebrating the launch of our third quarterly season, “Migrations,” on Saturday, July 1 from 3-7PM. RSVP

“Migrations” considers how artists, thinkers, and whole communities engage narratives of movement and traversal, sanctuary and refuge. Through contributions from artists Marwa Arsanios, Tania Bruguera, Banu Cennetoğlu, and Xaviera Simmons, Ulises will explore the poetics of migration and trouble our notions of origin and boundaries.

Image: Xaviera Simmons, “Superunknown (Alive In The)” (detail), 2010. 42 C-prints mounted on sintra with brace, each photo 20 x 30 in. Edition of 3. Installation view Perez Art Museum Miami in “Poetics of Relation” (2015), Courtesy David Castillo Gallery

Artist-Run Reading Spaces, Panel & Book Display

Sunday, June 4, 3:30–5PM

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Artist-Run Reading Spaces is part of BABZ FAIR 2017 Extended Program Series Knockdown Center, 52-19 Flushing Ave, Queens, New York 11378

From 1975 to 1978 in Amsterdam, Ulises Carrión operated Other Books and So, an artist-run bookstore and exhibition space dedicated to artists’ books and ephemera, which served as a key point of interchange between Latin American and European artists’ publishing communities. Drawing upon this example, this discussion brings together the founders of artist-run bookstores, libraries, and reading rooms. Ideas of circulation, access, and “making public” intersect both libraries and experimental publishing practices, and artist-run reading spaces offer alternative ways of actualizing these ideas outside of institutional paradigms. More than distribution points for texts, they function as social spaces of reading. Panelists will join in a 90-minute discussion of their projects, to be accompanied by a casual book display including items selected by the presenters and items from MoMA Library.

Panelists:

  • Gee Wesley, Ulises, Philadelphia
  • Rachel Valinsky, Wendy’s Subway, Brooklyn, NY
  • David Richardson, Dispersed Holdings, NYC
  • Kimi Hanauer & Bomin Jeon, Press Press, Baltimore
  • Devin N Morris, Brown Paper Zine Fair, 3 DOT ZINE, Brooklyn, NY

Moderator: Sarah Hamerman, Artist Book Cataloger, MoMA Library

Becky Suss Book Release

Saturday, May 20, 2017, 3–5PM

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Join Ulises for a book launch with artist Becky Suss. Enjoy libations, snacks and company celebrating the release of the ICA exhibition catalogue “Beck Suss.”

In the fall of 2015, Suss presented selections from her most recent body of work in her first solo museum exhibition curated by ICA’s Laporte Associate Curator, Kate Kraczon. Released in 2017, the fully illustrated catalogue for this exhibition includes an extended interview of Suss by Kate Kraczon.

“Meditative, large-scale paintings augmented by smaller studies in oil and ceramic reimagine the domestic spaces of her relatives with a focus on her late grandparents’ mid-century suburban home. The flattened architecture and exaggerated perspective of Suss’s canvases memorialize their collected art and objects through an intimate, archeological process that opens familial narrative to questions of class, politics, and religion.”

Becky Suss was born in 1980 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where she is currently based. She received an MFA from the University of California, Berkeley, a BA from Williams College, and in 2013 attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. In addition to ICA Philadelphia, Suss’ work has been exhibited at the Woodmere Art Museum, Pennsylvania, the Berkeley Art Museum, California, and The Berman Museum at Ursinus College, Pennsylvania, as well as at storied Philadelphia artist collectives Vox Populi and Space 1026, of which she is a former member. She is represented by Jack Shainman Gallery and Fleisher/Ollman Gallery. Her solo exhibition Homemaker is currently on view at Jack Shainman Gallery through June 3rd.

Image: Becky Suss, “1919 Chestnut (Three Cities, The Mother, Kiddush Hashem, Salvation, The Apostle, Mary, Nazarene),” 2015

High Tide Zine Release

Sunday, May 7, 2017, 4:00–6:00PM

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Join us at Ulises to celebrate the release of 3 new zines. “Leap of Faith” by Isaac Tin Wei Lin, “Two Way Mirror” by Clark Mizono, and “The Grand Inquisitor” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky with illustrations by Zoe Axelrod and Geoffrey KixMiller, are the first publications produced by High Tide and we are excited to share them with you.

Isaac Tin Wei Lin explores the realm where representation and buzzing abstraction meet. His surfaces are often densely covered in calligraphic, brushed and hand-drawn patterns that express both the logic and complexity of written language. Cartoon figures, often in the form of cats and dogs, make appearances, sometimes as larger-than-life-size cut-outs covered in pattern themselves.

Clark Mizono, is an artist and freelance photographer living and working in New York City.

High Tide is an artist-run gallery and project space located in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. Through formal exhibitions, performances, workshops and experimental programming, High Tide seeks to maintain a critical dialogue between artists and our local and global communities.

Philadelphia Art Book Fair

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Friday, May 5: 12:00pm-8:00pm

Saturday, May 6: 10:00am-6:00pm

We are excited to be participating in the Philadelphia Art Book Fair, co-presented by Philadelphia Photo Arts Center and The Print Center. It is a two-day event showcasing 70 plus exhibitors, from art book publishers to individual artists and institutions, local, national and international.

Location: Twelve 27, 1227 N. 4th Street, Phila, PA Entrance to the Philadelphia Art Book Fair is free, open to the public and fully accessible.

Dear Reader: On Diasporic Intimacy

Tuesday, April 25, 2017, 6:30PM–8PM

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“Diasporic intimacy does not promise an unmediated emotional fusion, but only a precarious affection– no less deep, yet aware of its transience.” - Svetlana Boym

Join Ulises for a group discussion facilitated by Jennifer Wilson on Svetlana Boym’s article “On Diasporic Intimacy: Ilya Kabakov’s Installations and Immigrant Homes.”

Please find the reading in the following link: Boym, Svetlana. “On Diasporic Intimacy: Ilya Kabakov’s Installations and Immigrant Homes.” Critical Inquiry, vol. 24, no. 2, 1998, pp. 498–524.

Jennifer Wilson is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pennsylvania where she is currently working on her first book, “Radical Chastity: Abstinence and the Political Imagination in Nineteenth Century Russia.” From 2015-2016, she participated in the Penn Humanities Forum on “Sex.” Her writings on literary culture, Russia, and politics have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Los Angeles Review of Books, and Al Jazeera America, among others. You can follow her on Twitter at @JenLouiseWilson.

Svetlana Boym’s article “On Diasporic Intimacy: Ilya Kabakov’s Installations and Immigrant Homes” is one of the texts included in “Selected Readings on Intimacy,” a presentation of books and articles choosen by scholar Lauren Berlant as her contribution to Ulises’s curatorial season “Intimacy.”

RSVP for Dear Reader: On Diasporic Intimacy

The Third Rail Issue 10 Philadelphia Launch

Saturday, April 15, 2017, 7PM–9PM

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Please join Ulises this Saturday for the Philadelphia launch of the newest issue of The Third Rail. The launch will feature a short screening program of videos connected to Issue 10 and Ulises’ quarterly theme, Intimacy. Jonathan Thomas, editor of The Third Rail, will give a brief introduction. Drinks and light refreshments will be available.

At 8pm we will screen a teaser from Adam Khalil and Zack Khalil’s second feature film, “Empty Metal,” co-directed with Barry James Sweitzer, followed by Mati Diop and Manon Lutanie’s “Liberian Boy” (2015), and two shorts by Alexander Kluge: “BLIND LOVE / Jean-Luc Godard: My mother had only seen silent films!,” and “TSCHAK TSCHAK BOING / Love in a Space Suit” (both 2001).

Issue 10 of The Third Rail features an in-depth interview with writer, filmmaker, and television pioneer Alexander Kluge by Jonathan Thomas, in which Kluge shares his theory of montage and constellational filmmaking, discusses his move from cinema into television, and unpacks his principle of the city; psychoanalyst Jamieson Webster recalls her first dreams on the analytic couch; actress and filmmaker Mati Diop and independent publisher Manon Lutanie present a four-minute dance film; film critics Cristina Álvarez López and Adrian Martin reflect on Isabelle Huppert’s performance style, both in print and with an audiovisual essay online; filmmaker Sky Hopinka discusses indigenous poetics, language revitalization, and experimental modes of documentary filmmaking with filmmakers Adam Khalil and Zack Khalil, and shares a video online; poet Anne Boyer writes on a rebellion against images; experimental flutist and composer Barbara Held is interviewed by Alexandra Alisauskas and Godfre Leung and discusses breath as a medium, composer-interpreter-audience relations, and her approach to the indeterminate scores of Alvin Lucier and Yasunao Tone; chef Michelle Gayer offers a tool for fighting fascism; and there are artist projects by John Fleischer and Sara Greenberger Rafferty.

The Third Rail is a free nonprofit periodical devoted to a discussion of modern and contemporary art, politics, philosophy, and culture, featuring critical essays and reviews, interviews, literary arts, and artist projects. Based in Minneapolis, The Third Rail is an editorially independent affiliate of The Brooklyn Rail.

Screening: Lawrence Abu Hamdan

Friday, April 14, 2017, 7PM – 9PM

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In response to Ulises’ current quarterly, Lawrence Abu Hamdan presents two works that cast a shadow on the theme of intimacy. “Saydnaya (the missing 19db),” recently commissioned for Sharjah Biennial 13, and “Language Gulf in the Shouting Valley,” (2013) contour intimacies of violence, separation, and conflict. The works communicate, in whispers and shouts, bonds nevertheless formed and performed in difficult – murderous – terrains: the prison, the courtroom, and the border. Venturing considerations of intimacy in relation to community, citizenship, and the state, this event also aims to question some of the presumed conditions of intimacy: proximity, disclosure, transparency, reciprocal knowledge, truth. This event is co-organized with Ulises by Kirsten Gill, who will also give an introduction. RSVP

Lawrence Abu Hamdan, “Language Gulf in the Shouting Valley,” 2013,
Digital video, 14’

Lawrence Abu Hamdan, “Saydnaya (the missing 19db),” 2017, Stereo audio, 12’

Image: Lawrence Abu Hamdan, “Language Gulf in the Shouting Valley,” 2013. Installation view at Kunsthalle St Gallen. Photo by Stefan Jaggi

Dear Reader: "Ban en Banlieue"

Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 6:30PM – 8:30PM

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“Will you give a hand to Ban? Do you have a sentiment, do you have class? Let me tell you before you extend yourself that Ban is disgusting. Let me tell you that Ban is a difficult person to love, full of transience. I could tell you things about Ban.”

Join Ulises for a reading group discussion and writing session led by Becky Huff Hunter on Bhanu Kapil’s book “Ban en Banlieue” —partly a response to Theresa Hak Kyung Cha’s murder—which struggles to memorialize the rape of a young Indian girl walking home alone during a race riot. This session will focus on roughly the first half of the book, found in the link below.

“Ban en Banlieu” PDF

Bring a notepad and pen in order to participate in writing exercises that draw upon the book’s themes. As the discussion will partly be discussing interpersonal violence, please help us maintain a safe space by being mindful and considerate of others.

Becky Huff Hunter is a writer and editor, who has recently written on Philadelphia’s contemporary art in “Artforum,” “Frieze,” and “Art Papers.” She previously organized the Writing Art and Life reading/writing groups at the Institute of Contemporary Art and Kelly Writers House, University of Pennsylvania, where she is also a trained Anti-Violence Advocate.

"Hyper Normalization" Screening

Friday, March 31, 2017, 7:30PM

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Please join Ulises for a screening of “Hyper Normalization” (Adam Curtis, 2016, 166 minutes) with an introduction by Ulises member and Philly-based designer, Joel Evey. Followed by drinks and mingling.

Adam Curtis explains how, at a time of confusing and inexplicable world events, politicians and the people they represent have retreated in to a damaging, & over-simplified version of the world.

[on ideas and consequences] Well, a lot of people go on about how I’m a leftist, but I’m not really, because I believe that ideas have consequences. And why I like people like Weber [German sociologist Max Weber (1864-1920)] is because they are challenging what I see as that crude left-wing vulgar Marxism that says that everything happens because of economic forces within society, that we are just surfing, our ideas are just expressions-froth on the deep currents of history, which is really driven by economics. I’ve never believed that. Of course, economic forces have a great effect on us. But actually, people’s ideas have enormous consequences. And to be honest, if you had to reduce what I do, I spend my whole time just looking at how ideas have consequences, not necessarily what the promoters of them intended, because I think that’s a really big thing in our time. I came into writing and describing and filming the world at the very moment that those old left-wing certainties were beginning to collapse, certainties that said somehow progress and modernity were on a inevitable path towards a particular destination in history. But it was also equally obvious to me the right-wing reaction-where you just bring a market force in to create a form of stability that goes nowhere-was equally not going to work. And I became interested in examining how ideas have led us to this position in ways that those who had the ideas didn’t really intend. People like Weber who were, in a sense, conservative sociologists of the late nineteenth century were looking at the consequences of rationality. At how scientific ideas were used by those in power in modern society-and what the consequences then were. I think this is still incredibly important to look at today. [2012] — http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0193231/bio

RSVP

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Screening: The Politics of Intimacy

Tuesday, March 21, 2017, 6:30 – 8:30PM

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Please join Ulises, in partnership with Moore College of Art and Deisgn, for a screening of “The Politics of Intimacy” (Julie Gustafson, 1972, 52 minutes) and “Now” (Lynda Benglis, 1973, 12 minutes) with an introduction by Jesse Pires, Program Curator at International House Philadelphia.

These two feminist works exemplify the intimacy and immediacy of emergent video technologies in the early 1970s. Both videos employ “close-up” framing, a cinematic device that more intimately connects a viewer to an onscreen subject. In “The Politics of Intimacy,” various women, representing a wide range of ages and social and economic backgrounds, openly discuss their sexual feelings and behaviors on topics ranging from orgasm to masturbation. The tape unfolds in a manner that resembles a candid conversion not unlike those of women’s consciousness-raising groups from the era. With Now, Benglis intensifies the relationship between viewer and screen as she interacts with various prerecorded versions of herself. The mediated intimacy of the artist speaking across time and space is downright haunting and foreshadows a future where screens and devices would become preferred modes of connection.

RSVP

International House Philadelphia

Moore College of Art and Design

Love, Optimized: Workshop and Pop-Up Show

Saturday, March 18, 2017

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Workshop: Saturday 2–5pm Limited capacity: Sign up at loveoptimizedworkshop.eventbrite.com

Pop-Up Show: Saturday 5pm–7pm + Sunday 12–6pm Features inventions blueprinted at the workshop. Open to all: RSVP for the Pop-Up Reception

Welcome to a world of problems, solved.

Love, Optimized is a multimedia experience by Object Solutions, a fictional company that envisions the high-tech future of romance—with a dose of dark humor.

In the Love, Optimized workshop, you become the inventor. Guided by our laboratorians, you partner up and draw blueprints for new technologies to solve everyday love troubles. The afternoon’s inventions become a pop-up show at Ulises, where visitors are invited to imagine the future of love—optimized.

Our aim is to provoke pressing questions about intimacy and innovation. By co-creating a vision of tech-assisted love, we engage in what Anthony Dunne calls “design for debate,” where we move away from thinking about technological applications to technological implications. We invite you to consider the possibilities and limitations of a future where intimacy is administered and supervised by consumer products.

Love, Optimized is a partnership between Ernesto D. Morales and Shelly Ronen.

For richer details, visit objectsolutions.net/love

For more intimate contact, join our mailing list at objectsolutions.net/mail

See the workshop overview + images: How to Design the Future of Love

See what participants have devised:

"New Lovers" Erotica Reading

Saturday, March 4, 2017, 6:30–8PM

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Authors Al Bedell and Larissa Pham will be reading excerpts from their short erotic fiction published by Badlands Unlimited and part of the “New Lovers” series. Each story has its own unique take on relationships, intimacy, and sex, as well as the complexities that bedevil contemporary life and culture today.

Join the intimate evening – drinks and light refreshments will be served.

Al Bedell, “I Would Do Anything For Love” Al Bedell is a writer who splits her time between New York and Los Angeles. Her writing explores quotidian trauma and the contemporary female condition. She studied Philosophy at the University of Hartford.

Larissa Pham, “Fantasian” Larissa Pham is a writer living in Brooklyn. She has written for Adult, Guernica, The Nation and Nerve. Pham studied painting and art history at Yale University.

Title Magazine Relaunch Party

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Since 2012, Title has been a fixture in the Philadelphia art world as an unaffiliated platform for art writing. Beginning in 2017, they are establishing a new structure in pursuit of broader, more conceptually-driven goals for content. Title Magazine’s new editorial team — Lindsay Buchman, Samantha Mitchell, Kaitlin Pomerantz, Meredith Sellers, and Bailey Sheehan — invites you to join in celebrating their relaunch at Ulises. Brunch cocktails and light snacks will be available!

RSVP

Image: Isabel Lederman

Nato Thompson: Culture As Weapon

Sunday, February 19, 2017, 4PM

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Book talk with Nato Thompson on his new book,”Culture as Weapon: The Art of Influence in Everyday Life.” Thompson is the artistic director of the nonprofit arts organization Creative Time, which commissions and supports socially engaged works of art.

“Culture as Weapon” is a spirited and insightful examination of how, over the past century, corporations, politicians, nonprofits, and activists alike have embraced the power of creativity to shape public opinion, for good and for ill. Thompson simultaneously investigates the way artists have reacted to this cultural transformation, from Andy Warhol’s prescient Pop Art to Dread Scott Tyler’s provocative installations to Suzanne Lacy’s social interventions. As he puts it, “the world has witnessed the realization of the age-old avant-garde demand that art become part of the everyday.”

RSVP

Launch Party Quarter No. 2 Intimacy

Saturday, February 11, 2017

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RSVP

Image: Sharon Hayes, “May 1st,” 2012. 5 Letterpress prints (framed), 14.5 x 19.75 in. Edition of 5 + 2 AP

Dear Reader: Excitable Speech

Tuesday, January 17, 2017, 6:30–8PM

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Join Ulises for a reading group discussion led by Maria Murphy on Judith Butler’s text “Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative.” This session’s reading will focus on Chapter One of “Excitable Speech” entitled, “Burning Acts, Injurious Speech,” found in the link below.

Butler, Judith. Chapter One. “Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative.” New York: Routledge, 1997. 43-69.

As part of the discussion, Murphy will perform “The Production of Voice,” a short spoken-word piece for voice and voice processor and John Cage’s “Aria” (1958), originally written for interpretation by Cathy Berberian.

“Excitable Speech” by Judith Butler is included in “Twelve Books & Seven Records: Re-voice,” a presentation of books and albums selected by curator Mark Beasley as his contribution to Ulises’s curatorial season Active Voice.

Active Voice considers the voice in relation to listening, language, and political agency through a series of programs, artworks, readings, and selected publications from contributors Mark Beasley, Hannah Black, and Steffani Jemison.

Maria Murphy is a PhD candidate in musicology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research considers the relationship between music technologies and body politics through the work of multimedia artists Laurie Anderson, Yoko Ono, and Karen Finley. In her dissertation, Maria maps how these artists participated in a particular mode of aesthetic activism, which took part in biopolitical shifts concerning the circulation and industrialization of information, the production of healthy and sickly bodies, and the political fictions of gender and sexuality during a precarious time for public health and social hygiene under Ronald Reagan’s administration. Maria is also interested in developing creative spaces for hands-on research. She is the co-founder of Listening (to) Cyborgs: A Media Archaeology Workshop on Sound Technologies.

Dear Reader: A Voice and Nothing More

Tuesday, January 10, 2017, 6:30-8PM

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Join Ulises for a book discussion on Mladen Dolars’s text “A Voice and Nothing More.” This event is the first in a new reading group series from Ulises entitled “Dear Reader.” The reading for this session is the introduction to “A Voice and Nothing More” found in the link below.

“A Voice and Nothing More,” Introduction

“A Voice and Nothing More” by Mladen Dolar is one of the publications included in “Twelve Books & Seven Records: Re-voice,” a presentation of books and albums selected by curator Mark Beasley as his contribution to Ulises’s curatorial season Active Voice.

Active Voice considers the voice in relation to listening, language, and political agency through a series of programs, artworks, readings, and selected publications from contributors Mark Beasley, Hannah Black, and Steffani Jemison.

Facilitating the discussion is Hammam Aldouri. Hammam Aldouri is an independent scholar who holds a PhD in philosophy from the CRMEP, Kingston University and a Helena Rubinstein Fellowship in Critical Studies from the Whitney Museum of American Art, Independent Study Program. His writing has been published in Radical Philosophy, Detroit Research and Field Journal. He is currently a contributor to the Philadelphia based online art magazine the Artblog.

Screen Time with Hannah Black

Sunday, December 18, 2016, 4PM

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Artist and writer Hannah Black. Black, will read via Skype from a selection of her recent writings. As a contributor to Active Voice, Hannah Black presents recent video works — including “Intensive Care/Hot New Track,” “Fall of Communism,” and “My Bodies” – that consider pop vocals as a space to explore violence, power, and pluralism.

Image: Hannah Black, “Fall of Communism,” 2014, video still

View the full “Fall of Communism” video

Odds & Ends Book Fair

December 9, 2016, 11:30AM–4:30PM

Ulises is heading to New Haven for the day to participate in the Odds & Ends Art Book Fair hosted by Yale University Art Gallery.

Steffani Jemison in Conversation

Friday, December 2, 2016, 6PM

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Steffani Jemison presents her 2014 two-channel sound piece, “Same Time,” a reprisal of a speech delivered in 1970 by Black Panther Party founder Huey P. Newton that has been reinterpreted by Brooklyn-based R&B group Sidetrack Boyz as a vocal improvisation. Her presentation will be followed by a conversation with Steffani and artist David Hartt.

Hello, Opening Party

November 12, 2016, 6–9PM

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